Food Reviews

Food & Child Nutrition, Faces & Visions

Faces & Visions

I fully believe that you are what you eat and in todays world our generations will continue to learn from their previous generation, us. Choosing how we eat impacts not only our health, but our life decisions as well. Eating healthy starts with the kids.

Jen Dalton, writer and editor of the “Local Eats” section of Civil Eats, a daily news source for critical thought about the American food system, writes, “Faces & Visions of the Food Movement: Nona Evans.

Faces with Visions is what Civil Eats sees Nona Evans as, currently the Global Executive Marketing Coordinator at Whole Foods with a vision much greater than short term nutritional benefits.

Nona Evans is a strong hearted and willing activist striving for better nutrition for children world-wide. Leading the “Whole Kids Foundation,” Evans is making a long term commitment for better access and education of child nutrition. Evans has impacted the lives of school children across the world by implementing salad bars and adding gardens or greenhouses in schools. She is strongly opinionated to allow children to make healthy choices for themselves and to discover that eating right and healthy is fun and nutritional!

Eating healthy provides the nutritional needs for proper brain growth and all physical development among youth. This is something that humanity has been struggling with ever since our very existence. Without it leads to malnourishment and underdevelopment. Through technology, nutritional science and implementation Evans is fueled by her motivation to aspire kids to eat healthy and make overall better decisions that will benefit them later on in life. We truly are what we eat and Evans looks out ten to twenty years from now and sees human adults making much healthier choices: “Our economic health, our community health, it all comes from our own vitality,” she says.

Our continuous goals should be focused upon wide-spread implementation of salad bars inside schools and nutritional education to benefit teachers who can in turn, return the favor. The healthier the kid, the healthier the student in my perspective and with a good school lunch provides the energy needed to feat the classroom.

Students check up on their vegetables in their school’s greenhouse

Since its launch in July of 2011, Nona has led the “Whole Kids Foundation” serving over 2.2 million students, implemented over 2,600 school salad bars, funded 1600 school gardens and has given over $9.6 million dollars in funds. Evans is not focusing necessarily on policy, but does see the end goal in mind which involves implementation on her part but will leave any changes of food policy up to the experts.

Nona Evans holding what she appears to love most, a vegetable.

Dalton, Jen . “Faces & Visions of the Food Movement: Nona Evans.” Civil Eats. N.p., 20 Jan. 2014. Web. 10 Feb. 2014. <http://civileats.com/2014/01/20/faces-visions-of-the-food-movement-nona-evans/#more-19430>.

http://civileats.com/2014/01/20/faces-visions-of-the-food-movement-nona-evans/#more-19430

White Potato Discrimination; The Fight Among the Industry and Congress

Potato lobbyists are very much active these days. It is obvious that the white potato should not be included in the USDA’s WIC food package.

Creator and writer of foodpolitics.com, a Blog covering up to date food politics reports, Marion Nestle writes highly qualified being Paulette Goddard Professor in the Department of Nutrition, Food Studies, and Public Health (the department she chaired from 1988-2003) and Professor of Sociology at New York University. Her degrees include a Ph.D. in molecular biology and an M.P.H. in public health nutrition, both from the University of California, Berkeley.

Nestle’s “The fight over white potatoes in WIC” article discusses the angles of including the white potato in WIC’s package.

So what’s going on here? USDA’s WIC program, “The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) provides Federal grants to States for supplemental foods, health care referrals, and nutrition education for low-income pregnant, breastfeeding, and non-breastfeeding postpartum women, and to infants and children up to age five who are found to be at nutritional risk,” does not include the white potato as part of their nutrition package.

Its not that the potato isn’t nutritional, its that studies have shown and proven that americans already consume enough of our favorite “white potato,” in out diet despite level of income or gender/race. We love our potato!

On average, Americans consume 126 lbs. of potatoes a year!

What WIC has done has specifically excluded our favorite potato in attempts to fully achieve their goal: to provide WIC recipients with better, well-rounded nutrition.

However, potato lobbyists are nonetheless fighting for their industry for WIC to include their cream of the crop. Why?

If potato lobbyist succeed in congress, they will in turn receive a portion of taxpayer money to benefit their industry when there is no need. Wait, greedy american food companies? No way!

An extreme to this succession would be if the white potato is granted, then all other competitive food products from companies not included in WIC’s package would grant leverage creating a vacuum affect to be included as well.

I’m right there with Marion Nestle on this one, It would be much better for WIC recipients and American democracy if the potato industry stopped manipulating Congress and interfering with USDA nutrition programs.

Marion, Nestle. “Food Politics.” » The fight over white potatoes in WIC. N.p., 27 Jan. 2014. Web. 12 Feb. 2014. <http://www.foodpolitics.com/2014/01/the-fight-over-white-potatoes-in-wic/&gt;.

http://www.foodpolitics.com/2014/01/the-fight-over-white-potatoes-in-wic/

 

Delivery Without a Tip?

A typical lunch party receives their food just as they like it, only without the waitress!

How about prompt food service delivery that is speedy fast and delivers right to your door and requires no tip? Sounds impossible right? Recent newer and greater technology has highly improved the unmanned aviation industry across the globe making a “food delivery drone,” not only highly possible, but practical and efficient as well.

CQ Researcher Writer Daniel McGlynn is a Californian independent journalist who covers science and the environment. “His work has appeared in The New York Times Magazine, Earth Island Journal, Bay Citizen, and other publications. He has a master’s degree in journalism from the University of California, Berkeley.” McGlynn’s “Domestic Drones” article relays the audience a broad range of the uses of drones and their potential while also covering how people feel if wide implementation were to occur in the near future.

Impact of Unmanned Aviation Forecast $82 billion by 2025

 

A drone, UAV, or in better terms is any unmanned aerial vehicle that is piloted by remote control or computer.These “drones” range from tiny, bird-sized crafts built by professionals or hobbyists, all the way to high multi-million dollar planes manufactured by the government that have more than a few uses by the military. But how soon can I get food to my door? I am wondering the same question.

Amazon recently introduced their “Amazon Prime Air Shipping” available option, sending out delivery drones to fulfill their orders and hope to begin implementation in 2015 making the unmanned drone industry a lot more common in the near future.

Assuming restaurants and food companies keep up, we could expect to see the food industry booming off of first generation food delivery drones anywhere within the next 2-4 years based on location. Just imagine avoiding the hassle of incorrectly ordering your favorite chinese take out food over the phone and now from the push of a button on a mobile app or computer fill out your order and boom! Quick and prompt delivery flown right to your doorstep with no tip necessary. Delivery boys might become a thing of the past but food delivery to your door will more than likely never be something modern humans could live with out.

Dominos Tests their Pizza Delivery drone

McGlynn, D. (2013, October 18). Domestic drones. CQ Researcher23, 885-908. Retrieved from http://0-library.cqpress.com.libraries.colorado.edu/cqresearcher/

Domestic Drones

 

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